NTA Blog: There is Still Time to Register for the International Taxpayer Rights Conference

May 9, 2019

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We are just weeks away from the 4th International Taxpayer Rights Conference. This year’s conference takes place May 23-24, 2019 at the University of Minnesota Law School in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The conference’s theme is Taxpayer Rights in the Digital Age: Implications for Transparency, Certainty, and Privacy. For two days, an international panel of experts will discuss topics ranging from big data and automation to artificial intelligence and data mining, and how they impact the taxpayer. We will also have panels on transparency and access to administrative guidance, and different countries’ approaches to whistleblowers. The full agenda is available online.

One of the greatest benefits of this conference is the opportunity to spend time conversing with a global community of scholars, practitioners and government officials about international taxpayer rights. More than 20 countries are represented at this year’s conference. We’ve shared comments from prior conference attendees here.

You can still register at www.taxpayerrightsconference.com, and I encourage you to do so as registration closes next week on Wednesday, May 15, 2019.

We have posted full videos and papers from the past conferences on the conference’s website here.

Visit TaxpayerRightsConference.com today for more information.  For questions, email tprightsconference@irs.gov.



The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the National Taxpayer Advocate. The National Taxpayer Advocate is appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury and reports to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. However, the National Taxpayer Advocate presents an independent taxpayer perspective that does not necessarily reflect the position of the IRS, the Treasury Department, or the Office of Management and Budget.